Book Review: The Devil’s Prayer by Luke Gracias

June 21, 2017 Book Reviews 0

I received this book for free from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

This book may be unsuitable for people under 17 years of age due to its use of sexual content, drug and alcohol use, and/or violence.
Book Review: The Devil’s Prayer by Luke GraciasThe Devil's Prayer by Luke Gracias
Published by Australian eBook Publisher on February 18th 2016
Pages: 294
Source: NetGalley
Goodreads
One StarOne StarOne StarOne StarHalf a Star

A nun commits suicide in front of thousands in Spain. In Australia, Siobhan Russo recognises that nun as her mother, Denise Russo, who disappeared six years ago.
In search of answers, Siobhan travels to the isolated convent where her mother once lived. Here she discovers Denise’s final confession, a book that details a heinous betrayal that left her crippled and mute, and Denise’s subsequent deal with the Devil to take revenge. In the desperate bargain Denise made with the Prince of Darkness, she wagered Siobhan’s soul.
As Siobhan discovers the fate of her soul, she learns that hidden within the pages of her mother’s confession is part of The Devil’s Prayer, an ancient text with the power to unleash apocalyptic horrors.
And now her mother’s enemies know Siobhan has it.
Can Siobhan escape an order of extremist monks determined to get the Prayer back? Can she save the world from its own destruction?
Explicit Content Warning: "The Devil’s Prayer" is a historical horror thriller that contains brutality, rape, sex, drug abuse and murder. Readers may find its content offensive and confronting.
You can view the video teaser for the book on https://vimeo.com/156061258.

 

This reminded me a lot of The DaVinci Code but for various many reasons. It is completely different but the plot does keep you wondering through the mystery if it is going to be solved or not. Much like DaVinci Code there must have been a TON of research done for this. The actual historical facts that are interwoven are spectacular and make the book fantastic.

The plot starts immediately and I was taken aback by many things that happened just in the first chapter. The entire rest of the book is used to explain what happened in the first chapter and why.

I enjoyed how the plot was written. It is written through letters that are a confession to her oldest daughter. Most of it is surrounding a mother and her feelings for her children and her findings in the time she has been away from her children.

The characterization is fantastic. The story is categorized under horror and there are some horrific elements involved. Very horrific in some cases. There are cases of rape, death (lots of death) but in the normal category of horror, as in compared to something like the Exorcist, I didn’t think this was very horrific. I had thoughts that this would be super scary and leave me with nightmares but really it was pretty tame, in that aspect.

I did, however, leave me with a lot of thoughts while reading and after I finished! It was so well done, and the imagery was so vivid that I felt like I was a part of the story. The phone would ring or my dogs would bark and I was shaken back into reality. While, some of the story line was a little slow, and there was a bit at the end that will definitely be a bit annoying to those that do not want to listen to liberal rhetoric, I thought the entire of it was so well done that I could not put it down. Only in times of necessity.

The ending was a bit weird. I searched and searched for a part two but found nothing. I think this is how it is supposed to end with leaves questions but also leaves answers. It’s not how I would have wanted it to end but it was GREAT.

In short: Absolutely fantastic. I loved nearly every word.

 

Rating Report
Plot
4.5 / 5
Character Development
5 / 5
Writing Style
4.5 / 5
Personal enjoyment
5 / 5
Cover
5 / 5
Overall: 4.8 / 5

 

 

 

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